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We asked Brain Pickings’ Maria Popova to curate a selection of books for The Library Shop, and to our surprise and enormous delight, we got something more wonderful than we could have ever imagined. As Maria explains:

"…my chronic maximalism soon kicked in — the single reading list soon became four reading lists (wisdom on writinggreat reads about New York Cityheart- and brain-stirring books on pets and animals, and timeless treats for young readers) and the simple tabletop display became an elaborate installation in the bookstore’s main window.

Check out a time-lapse video of the installation process above, and visit Brain Pickings for more behind-the-scenes photos and videos of the amazing display Maria created with artist Kelli Anderson, plus info on all her book recommendations.  

And visit The Library Shop to see the masterpiece yourself! 

"I’ve discovered there are a few ways to handle leaky tear glands while surrounded by a bunch of strangers. I’ve used them each depending on what book I’m reading and how sad it is."

To close out the weekend, read this highly amusing and all too relatable post about how to compose yourself when that pesky variety of sob-inducing literature makes you its victim. (via BookRiot)

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A gem from Dr Seuss’s Sleep Book, highlighted among George Saunders’s favorite children’s books. Saunders is also an Edward Gorey fan.




"Let me close by saying, from the perspective of someone with two grown and wonderful kids, that your instincts as parents are correct: a minute spent reading to your kids now will repay itself a million-fold later, not only because they love you for reading to them, but also because, years later, when they’re miles away, those quiet evenings, when you were tucked in with them, everything quiet but the sound of the page-turns, will, seem to you, I promise, sacred."
George Saunders — who will be at the library on Feb. 26 — may be a prodigiously gifted author and creative luminary, but at the end of the day, he’s also just a dad. His children’s book recommendations are, predictably, enchanting and original. Check them out above!

explore-blog:

A gem from Dr Seuss’s Sleep Book, highlighted among George Saunders’s favorite children’s books. Saunders is also an Edward Gorey fan.

"Let me close by saying, from the perspective of someone with two grown and wonderful kids, that your instincts as parents are correct: a minute spent reading to your kids now will repay itself a million-fold later, not only because they love you for reading to them, but also because, years later, when they’re miles away, those quiet evenings, when you were tucked in with them, everything quiet but the sound of the page-turns, will, seem to you, I promise, sacred."

George Saunders — who will be at the library on Feb. 26 — may be a prodigiously gifted author and creative luminary, but at the end of the day, he’s also just a dad. His children’s book recommendations are, predictably, enchanting and original. Check them out above!


I’ve also found that I can be drawn into ridiculous pissing matches online in ways that just wouldn’t happen otherwise, and I’ve never noticed any benefit. There is never a lesson learned, or a catharsis of victory or defeat. If you win anonymously, no one knows, and if you lose, you just change your pseudonym and start over, without having modified your point of view one bit.
If the troll is anonymous and the target is known, then the dynamic is even worse than an encounter between anonymous fragmentary pseudo-people. That’s when the hive turns against personhood….
When I criticize this type of online culture, I am often accused of being either an old fart or an advocate of censorship. Neither is the case. I don’t think I’m necessarily any better, or more moral, than the people who tend the lulzy websites. What I’m saying, though, is that the user interface designs that arise from the ideology of the computing cloud make people-all of us-less kind. Trolling is not a string of isolated incidents, but the status quo in the online world.

Currently reading: You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier.
What are you reading?

I’ve also found that I can be drawn into ridiculous pissing matches online in ways that just wouldn’t happen otherwise, and I’ve never noticed any benefit. There is never a lesson learned, or a catharsis of victory or defeat. If you win anonymously, no one knows, and if you lose, you just change your pseudonym and start over, without having modified your point of view one bit.

If the troll is anonymous and the target is known, then the dynamic is even worse than an encounter between anonymous fragmentary pseudo-people. That’s when the hive turns against personhood….

When I criticize this type of online culture, I am often accused of being either an old fart or an advocate of censorship. Neither is the case. I don’t think I’m necessarily any better, or more moral, than the people who tend the lulzy websites. What I’m saying, though, is that the user interface designs that arise from the ideology of the computing cloud make people-all of us-less kind. Trolling is not a string of isolated incidents, but the status quo in the online world.

Currently reading: You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier.

What are you reading?


"So by the time he got to America, he was just skin and bones. He barely made it alive." Her grandmother’s voice started to quiver. "And he lost a lot of his friends and family along the way. You should have heard him talk about it. I’m sorry you didn’t get to know him like I did. He was a really nice man. He wrote beautiful letters."
Emily took her grandmother’s arm with her one good arm. They had one more lap to walk.
"But here is the point, Emily. Are you ready for the point?"
"Yes," said Emily.
"Even after traveling all that way, and even on a diet composed almost exclusively of potato skin, all that for months and months, your great-grandfather still showed up in America with a full head of hair," she said triumphantly. "So I don’t know what the hell is wrong with your father."

Currently reading Tumblr’s favorite new book, The Middlesteins by Jami Attenberg. What are you reading?

"So by the time he got to America, he was just skin and bones. He barely made it alive." Her grandmother’s voice started to quiver. "And he lost a lot of his friends and family along the way. You should have heard him talk about it. I’m sorry you didn’t get to know him like I did. He was a really nice man. He wrote beautiful letters."

Emily took her grandmother’s arm with her one good arm. They had one more lap to walk.

"But here is the point, Emily. Are you ready for the point?"

"Yes," said Emily.

"Even after traveling all that way, and even on a diet composed almost exclusively of potato skin, all that for months and months, your great-grandfather still showed up in America with a full head of hair," she said triumphantly. "So I don’t know what the hell is wrong with your father."

Currently reading Tumblr’s favorite new book, The Middlesteins by Jami Attenberg. What are you reading?