April LIVE from the NYPL ScheduleMake sure to purchase your tickets before it’s too late, don’t miss out!Nathaniel Rich in Conversation with Slavoj Žižek: Worst-Case ScenariosMONDAY, APRIL 8, 2013, 7 P.M.
Philosopher Slavoj Žižek joins Nathaniel Rich for an exploration of worst-case scenarios, a subject at the heart of Rich’s new novel Odds Against Tomorrow.
WILLIAM GIBSONFRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013, 7 P.M.
William Gibson is the author of ten books, including, most recently, the New York Times-bestselling trilogy Zero History, Spook Country and Pattern Recognition. Gibson’s 1984 debut novel, Neuromancer, was the first novel to win the three top science fiction prizes—the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award. Gibson is credited with coining the term “cyberspace” in his short story “Burning Chrome,” and with popularizing the concept of the Internet while it was still largely unknown. He is also a co-author of the novel The Difference Engine, written with Bruce Sterling.
The Costs of Assimilation: André Aciman & Nicole KraussMONDAY, APRIL 22, 2013, 7 P.M.
What are the costs of assimilation into American society? And what happens when we become someone other than the person we thought we would be? In his new novel, Harvard Square, André Aciman explores these and other questions in a tale of friendship between a Jewish student and an Arab cab driver, set amid the bars and cafés of late 1970s Cambridge. Aciman is joined in conversation by novelist Nicole Krauss, author of The History of Love  to talk about themes that haunt them both: identity, exile, fiction, and memory.
JUNOT DÍAZTUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013, 7 P.M.
2012 MacArthur Fellow and Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Díaz joins Paul Holdengräber onstage to discuss multiculturalism, family, love, and the immigrant experience - prominent themes in the author’s works. Díaz’s first book, the short story collection Drown, established him as a writer with “the dispassionate eye of a journalist and the tongue of a poet” (Newsweek). His first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, established him as a bestseller and earned critical acclaim; Wao was named #1 Fiction Book of the Year” by Time magazine and spent more than 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. In his new book, This Is How You Lose Her, Díaz again offers a collection of short stories, all deeply concerned with love – obsessive love, illicit love, fading love, maternal love.

April LIVE from the NYPL Schedule
Make sure to purchase your tickets before it’s too late, don’t miss out!

Nathaniel Rich in Conversation with Slavoj Žižek: Worst-Case Scenarios
MONDAY, APRIL 8, 2013, 7 P.M.

Philosopher Slavoj Žižek joins Nathaniel Rich for an exploration of worst-case scenarios, a subject at the heart of Rich’s new novel Odds Against Tomorrow.

WILLIAM GIBSON
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013, 7 P.M.

William Gibson is the author of ten books, including, most recently, the New York Times-bestselling trilogy Zero History, Spook Country and Pattern Recognition. Gibson’s 1984 debut novel, Neuromancer, was the first novel to win the three top science fiction prizes—the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award. Gibson is credited with coining the term “cyberspace” in his short story “Burning Chrome,” and with popularizing the concept of the Internet while it was still largely unknown. He is also a co-author of the novel The Difference Engine, written with Bruce Sterling.

The Costs of Assimilation: André Aciman & Nicole Krauss
MONDAY, APRIL 22, 2013, 7 P.M.

What are the costs of assimilation into American society? And what happens when we become someone other than the person we thought we would be? In his new novel, Harvard Square, André Aciman explores these and other questions in a tale of friendship between a Jewish student and an Arab cab driver, set amid the bars and cafés of late 1970s Cambridge. Aciman is joined in conversation by novelist Nicole Krauss, author of The History of Love  to talk about themes that haunt them both: identity, exile, fiction, and memory.

JUNOT DÍAZ
TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013, 7 P.M.

2012 MacArthur Fellow and Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Díaz joins Paul Holdengräber onstage to discuss multiculturalism, family, love, and the immigrant experience - prominent themes in the author’s works. Díaz’s first book, the short story collection Drown, established him as a writer with “the dispassionate eye of a journalist and the tongue of a poet” (Newsweek). His first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, established him as a bestseller and earned critical acclaim; Wao was named #1 Fiction Book of the Year” by Time magazine and spent more than 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. In his new book, This Is How You Lose Her, Díaz again offers a collection of short stories, all deeply concerned with love – obsessive love, illicit love, fading love, maternal love.

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